Stages Of Pregnancy
All About Early Signs Of Pregnancy and Other Pregnancy Related Information
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CONCERNS REGARDING EARLY FETAL DEVELOPMENT

  Signs of Pregnancy  Pregnancy Ultrasound  Breastfeeding  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The development of a baby is quite an intricate journey. From the moment that the egg and sperm meet, a baby is beginning the developmental process. This early part of development lays the foundation for a healthy pregnancy and the birth of a healthy baby. Unfortunately, because these early weeks involve such a complex process, things can go wrong and ultimately end in a pregnancy loss. If a possible complication in early pregnancy is suspected, your health care provider will use a combination of blood tests and ultrasound tests to make a clear diagnosis. A blood test can be used to monitor hCG levels and progesterone levels. Ultrasounds can be used to visually see what development is taking place in the uterus and to measure the progress.

It is common to have many questions about what this early development truly involves and what is to be expected. We have gathered information from different sources in order to provide the best guidelines of what normal early fetal development looks like. However, just as every woman is different, every pregnancy develops differently. This information should be used as a general guide for healthy pregnancy development, although development may vary due to the mother’s health or a miscalculation of ovulation. Gestational age is the age of the pregnancy from the last normal menstrual period (LMP), and fetal age is the actual age of the growing baby. Most references to pregnancy are usually in gestational age rather than fetal age development, but we have included both so that it is clear what stage development is at.

Week 1 & 2 Gestational Age - (Conception)

At this stage, the menstrual period has just ended and your body is getting ready for ovulation. For most women, ovulation takes place about 11 - 21 days from the first day of the last menstrual period. During intercourse, several hundred million sperm are released in the vagina. Sperm will travel through the cervix and into the fallopian tubes. When conception takes place, the sperm will penetrate an egg and create a single set of 46 chromosomes called a zygote - the basis for a new human being. The fertilized egg, called a morula, spends a couple of days traveling through the fallopian tube toward the uterus and dividing into cells (this dividing process is where many chromosomal abnormalities occur). The morula becomes a blastocyst and will eventually end up in the uterus. Anywhere from day 6 - 12 after conception, the blastocyst will imbed into the uterine lining and begin the embryonic stage.

 

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